CITES 2019: What’s Conservation Got To Do With It?

Jaguar. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.

“If a species is found in multiple countries, and is declining or endangered in some and more secure in others, sound conservation practice and the precautionary principle dictate that international measures should focus on the populations needing the most help.”

Wild male saiga antelope (Saiga tatarica) visiting a waterhole at the Stepnoi Sanctuary, Astrakhan Oblast, Russia. Photo credit: Andrey Giljov [CC BY-SA 4.0]

“When governments join a treaty such as CITES, they have agreed to act for the global good, and not only act or decide based on their own national or trade interests.”

Glass frog in Costa Rica. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.

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WCS saves wildlife and wild places worldwide through science, conservation action, education, and inspiring people to value nature.

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Wildlife Conservation Society

Wildlife Conservation Society

WCS saves wildlife and wild places worldwide through science, conservation action, education, and inspiring people to value nature.

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